That Reading Life, Top Ten Tuesday

10 slightly weird niche books/genres I really like

This post is part of a blog hop for Top Ten Tuesday hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. See how it works here.

When I worked at my public library for about a year, a coworker told me, “I only read nonfiction philosophy.” She was great at recommending books not in her preferred genre to patrons though.

I was thinking about her the other day and ruminating on my own niche tastes, the deep dives I tend to take into some obscure topics. I thought about how many books I own that are kind of peculiarly un-mainstream. I definitely delight in following my curiosity, which is, now that I think about it, one of the chief reasons I read for pleasure.

Anyway, this week’s Top Ten Tuesday theme is a “love freebie,” meaning, I think, that we should create a top ten list of book-related things we love. So, here we go.

Ten slightly weird niche books/genres I really like

1. Ros Byam Shaw

Covers of Perfect English Farmhouse, Perfect English, and English Eccentric by Ros Byam Shaw

I want to live in these books.

I love English interior design so so much. It encompasses both decorating like you live in an English country estate and decorating like you live in a Hobbit Hole. Both are aesthetics to which I aspire.

Ros Bym Shaw is the author of several fantastic coffee table-style decorating books on the topic. She is also my favorite decorating author, though I also adore Justina Blakeney.

2. Needlepoint

Covers of Hoopla and Plain and Fancy

I used to have a blog about needlepoint. A few years ago, I got suuuuper into it and spent a lot of time creating needlepoint and cross-stitch works and, of course, researching and reading about those topics. I don’t do needlepoint anymore because I actually have a hand injury and can’t grip a needle all that well. (It’d be like a dolphin using its flippers to sew.) But I still enjoy books on stitching and the history of “women’s work.” I particularly like Hoopla: The Art of Unexpected Embroidery and the out of print history Plain & Fancy: American Women and Their Needlework, 1650-1850.

3. Unusual job memoirs

Book Covers: Smoke Gets in Your Eyes; It's What I Do; and The Long Haul

To read one of these, I have to actually be interested in the job the writer is doing or has done. Three of my recent faves are:

I also just heard about The Line Becomes a River, a memoir by a former border patrol guard, which I’ll be putting on hold at the library.

4. New Age

Book covers: You Can Heal Your Life; Ghosts Among Us; and Children's Past Lives

I wrote about my somewhat embarrassing affinity for New Age books here. I think it comes from some urge to seek a way of spirituality outside of traditional religion. But I’m not willing to commit to New Age beliefs either. The jury is out, I guess. Anyway, that post mentions a few books I’ve read that are the furthest out from logic.

A few more I’ve enjoyed:

5. Nannies

Covers of: Jane Eyre; This House is Haunted; and Governess

Why do I identify so hard with nannies? I dunno but if the protagonist is a nanny, I’m in.

Some favorites:

  • Jane Eyre (obvi)
  • This House is Haunted
  • Governess: The Lives and Times of the Real Jane Eyres – This is a somewhat academic look at the lives of well-known nannies, including, most interestingly, Mary Wollstonecraft and Claire Clairmont (lover of Lord Byron with whom she had a child). I enjoyed this a lot, but at first I was hoping it’d be a peek into the daily lives of the governesses—it wasn’t. If anyone knows of a book like that, I’d love to read it!

6. Haunted houses

haunted house book covers

I like books that make me afraid to get up and go to the bathroom in the middle of the night.

Books like:

  • The Haunting of Hill House – If that nighttime door-banging doesn’t get to you, you are not human.
  • Rebecca – Asks the classic question: Is the house haunted or is it all in your head?
  • The Doll in the Garden – I read this book as a kid and it stuck with me so long that I re-read it last year. Yep, still freaked me out. Mary Downing Hahn, you wizard.

I’m always looking for more of these, so if you have any suggestions, hit me up in the comments—bonus if there’s a nanny!

7. Foster care

foster

I’m slightly obsessed with books by/about foster mothers and children, both fiction and nonfiction. I wrote a post about my most recent dive into that world here.

These are a few I recommend:

8. Animal memoirs

animals

No, not memoirs by animals. Memoirs by people about their time spent with animals.

Some favorites are:

9. Tudor history

TudorBooks

IMG_20180207_184005.jpg

Part of my Tudor and Tudor-related collection

I’ve always been interested in British history and literature in general, but honestly, my interest in the Tudors was cemented by the show The Tudors. I fell in love and went through a phase where I read everything I could get my hands on about Henry VIII and his wives. Then, everything I could about any other Tudor.

 

Here’s a mishmash of books I’ve read on the topic:

I will also confess to reading The Other Boleyn Girl and seeing the movie. DON’T JUDGE ME.

10. Women leaving oppressive religions

memoir

I left Catholicism (not because I found it oppressive but because it didn’t make sense for me) so I suppose that’s where this interest comes from. I like books about women leaving long-established religions as well as books about women who’ve left homes where weird made-up religious rules were foisted upon them.

These are a few standouts:

11. And a bonus category: anything about how the French do it better

French

Sick of these books? I find them condescending at best, but I still love a good book on how the French are doing things better. Cooking better, eating better, raising their children better. I wonder if I’m into this theme because I partially agree with the sentiment?

A few I’ve enjoyed:

To see what other people did with this Top Ten prompt, check out today’s post on That Artsy Reader Girl.

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10 thoughts on “10 slightly weird niche books/genres I really like

  1. These are so great!!! Love the weird job memoirs category and especially women leaving religions..I’m so endlessly fascinated by these books! I’m glad to find others who are too, because sometimes I think it’s a weird interest to have. You have to read Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s Infidel, if you haven’t already. I’m investigating Leaving the Saints, it sounds really good..thanks for putting that on my radar! And I have a copy of Orthodox I’ve been meaning to get to forever. Sy Montgomery made me fall in love with octopuses too. Love this list!

    Like

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